Short Communication

Comparison of dental carcass maturity in non-castrated male F1 Angus-Nellore cattle finished in feedlot

Bismarck Santiago1, Welder Baldassini1,2,*, Laís Tomaz1, Leone Rocha1, Wellington Santos2, Rogério Curi1,2, Luis Artur Chardulo1,2, Otávio Machado Neto1,2
Author Information & Copyright
1School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, São Paulo State University (FMVZ UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo 18618681 , Brazil.
2School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, São Paulo State University (FMVZ UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.
*Corresponding Author: Welder Angelo Baldassini, School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, São Paulo State University (FMVZ UNESP), Botucatu, São Paulo 18618681 , Brazil. Phone: +551438802989. E-mail: w.baldassini@unesp.br.

© Copyright 2021 Korean Society for Food Science of Animal Resources. This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Received: Jan 19, 2021 ; Revised: Feb 27, 2021 ; Accepted: Mar 23, 2021

Published Online: Mar 25, 2021

Abstract

Dental classification of carcasses is used as a parameter of cattle maturity at slaughter, and it can influence carcass and meat quality traits. Brazilian beef-packing companies use the number of permanent incisor (P.I.) teeth as a parameter for bonus and certification of carcasses with superior quality. However, when non-castrated male such as F1 Angus-Nellore (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) are slaughtered, only animals without P.I. teeth are subsidized by the breed association. We evaluated these animals finished in feedlot for 180 days with zero versus two P.I. teeth on the carcass and meat quality traits. At the time of slaughter, 88 carcasses were selected, forming two treatments according to dental carcass maturity (0 versus 2 P.I. teeth; 44 animals per category). It was demonstrated that the number of P.I. teeth (0 versus 2 P.I.) did not influence (P > 0.05) carcass (weights, yield, cooling loss, ribeye area and the backfat thickness) and meat quality traits (Longissimus thoracis chemical composition, color, cooking losses, shear force and pH). Thus, dental carcass maturity (zero versus two P.I. teeth) does not influence non-castrated male F1 Angus-Nellore finished in feedlot for 180 days. This is the first study to demonstrate that carcasses of non-castrated male F1 Angus-Nellore with two P.I. teeth should be subsidized in a similar way to those with zero P.I. teeth. Moreover, Brazilian beef-packing companies could produce heavier and leaner carcasses of acceptable quality though the use of crossbred cattle such as non-castrated F1 Angus Nellore.

Keywords: Beef cattle; Bos indicus; dentition; meat quality; tenderness


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Special Issue: 67th ICoMST 2021


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