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Direct Detection of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella spp. in Animal-derived Foods Using a Magnetic Bead-based Immunoassay
Korean J. Food Sci. An. 2018;38:727-736
Published online August 31, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2018.e11
© 2018 Korean Society for Food Science of Animal Resources

Jong-Hui Kim, Jae Gyu Yoo, Jun-Sang Ham, and Mi-Hwa Oh*

National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Wanju 55365, Korea
Correspondence to: Mi-Hwa Oh
National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Wanju 55365, Korea
Tel: +82-63-238-7379
Fax: +82-63-238-7397
E-mail: moh@korea.kr
Received April 16, 2018; Revised June 21, 2018; Accepted July 1, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
In this study, an immuno-magnetic bead (IMB)-based assay was developed to simultaneously detect Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella spp. and was tested in four animal-derived foods: beef, ham, egg, and ricotta cheese. The IMB-based assay exhibited good specificity by binding to five E. coli serotypes [capture efficiency (CE) average (avg.) 90.4%], five S. aureus strains (CE avg. 91.4%), and five Salmonella serotypes (CE avg. 95.4%) but not binding to non-target bacteria (CE<10%). Furthermore, the assay detected all three pathogens with a detection limit of 10 CFU/g without the need for enrichment or additional platforms. Since the results demonstrated that the IMB-based assay can effectively separate and enrich target bacteria from a variety of animal-derived food matrixes, the assay exhibits good specificity for potential use in providing rapid, immunological, presumptive identification of pathogenic bacteria.
Keywords : foodborne pathogen, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp., immunomagnetic beads


August 2018, 38 (4)