search for




 

Formula Optimization of a Perilla-canola Oil (O/W) Emulsion and Its Potential Application as an Animal Fat Replacer in Meat Emulsion
Korean J. Food Sci. An. 2018;38:580-592
Published online June 30, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.5851/kosfa.2018.38.3.580
© 2018 Korean Society for Food Science of Animal Resources

Dicky Tri Utama, Haeseong Jeong, Juntae Kim, and Sung Ki Lee*

Department of Applied Animal Science, College of Animal Life Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, Korea
Correspondence to: Sung Ki Lee
Department of Applied Animal Science, College of Animal Life Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, Korea
Tel: +82-33-250-8646
Fax: +82-33-251-7719
E-mail: skilee@kangwon.ac.kr
Received April 20, 2018; Revised May 29, 2018; Accepted May 29, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
The formulation of an oil/water (o/w) emulsion made up of a mixture of perilla oil and canola oil (30/70 w/w) was optimized using a response surface methodology to find a replacement for animal fat in an emulsion-type meat product. A 12 run Plackett-Burman design (PBD) was applied to screen the effect of potential ingredients in the (o/w) emulsion, including polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR), fish gelatin, soy protein isolate (SPI), sodium caseinate, carrageenan (CR), inulin (IN) and sodium tripolyphosphate. The PBD showed that SPI, CR and IN showed promise but required further optimization, and other ingredients did not affect the technological properties of the (o/w) emulsion. The PBD also showed that PGPR played a critical role in inhibiting an emulsion break. The level of PGPR was then fixed at 3.2% (w/w total emulsion) for an optimization study. A central composite design (CCD) was applied to optimize the addition levels of SPI, CR or IN in an (o/w) emulsion and to observe their effects on emulsion stability, cooking loss and the textural properties of a cooked meat emulsion. Significant interactions between SPI and CR increased the cooking loss in the meat emulsion. In contrast, IN showed interactions with SPI leading to a reduction in cooking loss. Thus, CR was also removed from the formulation. After optimization, the level of SPI (4.48% w/w) and IN (14% w/w) was validated, leading to a perilla-canola oil (o/w) emulsion with the ability to replace animal fat in an emulsion-type meat products.
Keywords : canola oil, meat emulsion, oil/water emulsion, perilla oil, response surface


June 2018, 38 (3)